Sundial in the Corpus Christi College

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Corpus Christi College is one of the constituent colleges of the university of Oxford. It was founded in 1517 and one of its symbols is the Pelican sundial erected in 1581 by Charles Turnbull in the main quadrangle. I went to visit the College but unluckily it was closed. Therefore, I asked permission from a guard to let me go in to see the sundial closer and he agreed. The sundial is wonderful and has a pelican on its top:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

All the column is another sundial and it’s explaines the way how the sundial works:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

There is a copy of this sundial in the university of Princeton known as Mather Sundial (you can see more information clicking on the picture below):

The Mather Sundial, which sits in the center of McCosh Courtyard, is a replica of the Turnbull Sundial (1551) at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. It was given in 1907 by Sir William Mather, governor of Victoria University in Manchester, England, “to symbolize the connection not only between Oxford and Princeton, but between Great Britain and America.” There are 24 different dials on it, and the frustum supports a globe (representing the earth) with a pelican on top (the symbol of Corpus Christi College).

At one time, the Mather Sundial was the province of seniors, who by custom enjoyed the exclusive privilege of sitting on its steps between classes.

Mather Sundial, McCosh Courtyard (Photo by Jacob Bregman '06)

Source: Mather Sundial

Location: The Corpus Christi College in Oxford (map)

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