The Museum of the History of Science (III)

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

The mathematicalinstruments are also part of the collection. For example, there is a 17th-century box with some wooden polyhedra and some models for the study of Spherical Trigonometry:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

And more wooden models in this mathematical box:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

John Rowley was one of the leading London instrument makers in the late 17th and early 18th centuries and there are some mathematical compasses and instruments made by him in the collection:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Object number 1 is a proportional compass meanwhile number 5 is a ruler with pencil and dividers and number 6 is a slide rule.

Of course, if we are in a museum where the History of the Mathematics is exhibited, Napier’s rods must be here:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Unsigned, English, c. 1679

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Unsigned, English, 17th century?

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Charles Cotterel’s Arithmetical Compendium, Unsigned, English, c.1670

As in the Pitt Rivers Museum, the abacus also have their space in the showcases:

Oriental abacuses use beads on rods to represent numbers. Addition and substraction can be quickly performed by flicking the beads to and fro. Rather than ten beads in each column, the Chinese abacus uses five ‘unit’ beads and two ‘five’ beads (1 and 2). The Japanese abacus has just four ‘unit’ beads and one ‘five’ in each column (3).

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

The next Arithmetical instrument was made in the 18th century for counting. Addition was performed by turning the brass discs but since there isn’t no mechanism it was up to the user to carry tens:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

I am going to finish this post with this reproduction of the Measurers by the Baroque painter Van Balen (1575 – 17 July 1632) which can be seen upstairs:

The Measurers. Hendrick van Balen

Location: The Museum of the History of Science (map)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: