Whipple Museum of the History of Science (IV)

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Some mathematical objects also exhibited here like this Gunter’s square made in 1567. Gunter also invented his scale for computing adapting the new logarithms invented by Napier in 1614. Hence, it’s time to start our visit to all the Napier’s rods and slide rules of the exhibition. Let’s have a look to a couple of them, like these English Napier’s rods from 1720…

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

or this other ivory set made from the 17th century:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

From Gunter scales the slide rules were invented and this spiral logarithmic scale by John Holland (1650) is a very good example of the great inventions of the men from the Renaissance:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

After the slide rules and before the computers, ihis fragment of the ‘Difference Engine No. 1’ by Charles Babbage (1832-3)  assembled by his son Henry Babbage (c.1880) must also be exhibited:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Finally, a very curious mathematical object: this magic cube made by A. H. Frost in 1877:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Each row, each column and each diagonal have the same sum!

Photography by Carlos Dorce

LocationWhipple Museum of the History of Science in Cambridge (map)

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