Tag Archives: Gauss

The mathematicians in the Walhalla

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

The Walhalla is a neo-classical hall of fame which honours the most important people in German history. It was conceived in 1807 by Ludwig I of Bavaria (king from 1825 to 1848) and its construction took place between 1830 and 1842 designed by Leo von Klenze.

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

The Walhalla was inaugurated on October 18, 1842 with 96 busts and 64 commemorative plaques for people with no available portrait and everything was presided by the great King Ludwig:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Among all these very famous people related with the German history there are some… of course… mathematicians who share this space with Bach, Göethe, Beethoven, Guttemberg,  Luther, Otto von Bismarck,…  First of all, Dürervis the great German painter from the Renaissance who applied a lot of perspective new techniques to his paintings:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

The great astronomers are also here. Regiomontanus,…

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Herschel,…

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Copernicus,…

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

and Kepler:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

The great Leibniz…

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

and the greatest Gauss (added in 2007), also have their busts in this hall of fame:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Finally, Albert Einstein’s bust was added in 1990:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

I must say that the commemorative plaques also mention Alcuin of York, Albertus Magnus and the Venerable Bede, all ot them related with the wonderful Arithmetics!

Come to Regensburg to see this beautiful (and strange) place!

Location: Walhava in Donaustauf (map)

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Hewelianum Centre in Gdansk

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

I visited the Hewelianum Centre when I was in Gdansk and I discovered a new science museum which must be located in all the tourist guides:

The Hewelianum Centre is an educational and recreational centre for all age groups situated on the grounds of the Fort Góra Gradowa. The view from the top of the hill is the panorama of the historic town and the industrial landscape of the shipyard grounds. A picturesque park and a complex of restored 19th-century military remains hosting interactive exhibitions – this is today’s image of the Fort of Góra Gradowa.

Science popularization is the main objective of the Hewelianum Centre. Interactive and multimedia exhibitions and popular science events disclose the mysteries of physics and astronomy, transfer the visitors to the past, making the historic events better understandable in the present, teach how to be sensitive to the beauty of nature, and strengthen in visitors the belief that we are all responsible for our planet. In Hewelianum Centre you can perceive the world, learn about it, and relax yourself in an interactive, creative, and innovative way!

One of the exhibitions is called “Puzzle” (why not “Maths”?) and it’s a place where people can play with Mathematics:

Break the code and discover a new dimension of mathematics!

The “Puzzle” exhibition is a three-dimensional space: mathematical, interactive, and unconventional. It consists of more than 20 stations for experimenting – where mathematics governs, but in an unprecedented way!

By crossing the mathematical “puzzle” threshold, we enter the world of geometry, symmetry, and numbers. The mathematical setting, however, is only a backdrop for interactive learning and fun. A collection of the exhibition’s main attractions includes the multiplication tower, the Pythagorean theorem in liquid form, and the Möbius strip. Here you can also see what your face would look like if it were composed of two left or two right halves or check whether a meter is the same length for all. Visiting the mathematical “Puzzle” is a perfect idea for a unique scientific experience.

The exhibition is located in the Guardhouse over the Mortar Battery postern

The room is small but all the walls and corners are full of Maths experiments:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

For example, there is a Galton box (or Bean machine) where Pascal’s triangle and the Gaussian function can be observed perfectly.

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

You can also play with the Towers of Hanoi and discover that the minimum number of moves required to solve the puzzle is 2n – 1, where n is the number of disks (this problem was first publicized in the West by Édouard Lucas in 1883):

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Did you know that it’s possible to construct a byke with squared wheels? Yes, of course. The path for this bike must be formed by contiguous series of inverted catenaries!

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

And had you ever seen such a wonderful way to demonstrate the Theorem of Pythagoras? Water inside the square constructed on the hypothenusa fills perfectly in the two squares constructed on the other two sides:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Obviously, there are Möbius strips and Klein’s bottles:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

And you can play with the light to discover the four conics:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

There are poster about a lot of mathematical subjects but tha puzzle that fascinatd so much to my son and daughter was this experiment with volumes. They discovered that the volume of a prism is three times the volume of the corresponding pyramid although they played with the red sand preparing cornflakes for breakfast!

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

If you visit Gdansk you must go to Hewelianum Centre and really enjoy Maths!

Location: Hewelianum Centre in Gdansk (map)