Kepler’s last home in Regensburg

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Kepler’s last home is this orange house located in Keplerstrasse 5 in Regensburg. Reading the famous Kepler’s biography written by Max Caspar:

[…] On November 2 [1630] he rode, tired, on a skinny nag, over The Stone Bridge into Regensburg. He took up quarters in Hillebrand Billj’s house in the street now named after him. This acquaintance was a tradesman and later an innkeeper.

Only a few days after his arrival Kepler came down with an acute illness. His body was weakened by much night study, by constant worry, and also by the long journey at a bad time of year. In the beginning he attributed no significance to his being taken ill. He had often before suffered from attacks of fever. He believed that his fever originated from “sacer ignis”, fire-pustules. As the illness became worse, an attempt was made to help him by bleeding. But soon he began to lose consciousness and became delirious. Several pastors visited him and “refreshed him with the vitalizing water of consolation”. It is not said anywhere that holy communion was afforded him. In the throes of death Pastor Christoph Sigmund Donauer rendered him aid. When, almost in the last moment of his life, he was asked on what he pinned his hope of salvation, he answered full of confidence: only and alone on the services of Jesus Christ; in Him is based, as he wanted to testify firmly and resolutely, all refuge, all his solace and welfare. At noon on November 15 this pious man breathed his last. […].

A plaque on the facade says that this is the house which I was looking for when I have arrived at Regensburg:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Bad luck! This small museum is only open in the weekends and it’s possible to rent a guided visit only for groups! I’ve not arrived here to give up! Finally, I’ve been able to visit it and the first thing that I’ve seen… the magnificent bust of the last owner of the house…

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

… over a plaque in German language where it’s possible to read a little part of this story:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

The museum located in the house is very small and explains Kepler’s life and works focussing the interest in his astronomical discoveries and his three laws.

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

There is also a representation of the barrels whose volume was calculated precisely by Kepler in 1615:

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Another bust representing the great mathematician is in the room of the first floor next to some information about his commemorative monument also in Regensburg.

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

There are a lot of Kepler’s works (which seem to be original) and this wonderful German edition of Napier’s logarithms (1631) which couldn’t be used by Kepler but exemplifies the great impact that this powerful calculator had in the beginning of the 17th century.

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Of course, his Astronomia Nova, his Harmonices mundi,… and his Tabula Rudolphinae are also exhibited.

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

There also are explanation about his relation with Tycho Brahe and the Copernican system and a lot of astronomical instruments like sextants, globes, compasses,…

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Finally, I want to say goodbye looking at this famous portrait. This man discovered the elliptical orbits of the palnets and his obsession with numbers let him find the second and the third law. Copernicus was right and Newton will be confirm all this theories. The World was explained (Wait Einstein, wait!).

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Photography by Carlos Dorce

Location: Kepler’s museum in Regensburg (map)

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2 responses

  1. Melissa Kepler | Reply

    I stumbled on your blog while looking up information about Uraniborg. I have been to Weil der Stadt and can’t wait to return to Europe again to see more historic science landmarks! You have documented all these locations I have dreamed of seeing. Thank you for sharing your experiences!

    1. carlesdorce | Reply

      Thank you bery much for your words. You sre very kind.

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